Keeping Up With School and Creative Writing by Emma Cooney

School work is stressful and hard enough to manage for some people, including me. So adding extra creative writing work with analytical responses and reflections, can be overwhelming. I tend to sit at my desk staring at my computer for up to an hour debating whether school is worth it or not. Even though I do have these thoughts, I know that in order to live a happy, successful life, I have to at least graduate high school. I also realized that in order to maintain my sanity while also keeping up with my school and creative writing work, I would have to reach out and change.

There is a stigma against asking for help if you’re struggling to complete work, even if you understand the material. Like most people, I have always had issues with procrastination. It became a habit, a system that is incredibly easy to fall into. To break out of it, it takes a lot of effort and sometimes I just don’t have that energy. So, if I wanted to succeed in creative writing and school, I had to push myself hard to not fall back into my slump.

As a highschooler, it is also normal to have mental health issues, which can contribute a lot to how well I do in school. So, being a procrastinator and dealing with mental health meant that I would have my work cut out for me. I started setting up a schedule for work, which may seem simple to other people, but for me it was a big step up from not even knowing what was due the next day. Little steps like talking to Heather Woodward, talking to my dad, creating a schedule that left relaxation time for myself, and really realizing that I need to get a grip on my life helped me turn a corner.

Although creative writing and school work can be a lot, it isn’t impossible if you have a drive and care for the classes. A lot of adults talk about how they “need to get their life together,” and I think even high schoolers shouldn’t be afraid to make changes and reach out, especially if they have an art discipline. It isn’t a bad thing to have issues with completing work, and the only way to overcome it is to realize that. In my case, Heather Woodward and my dad were the ones to help me and now I feel more successful.

Emma Cooney, Class of 2021